Success in a Samurai’s Soul

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We control a very few things in our lives. Just because one day we decided to become a famous recording musician or a concerto virtuoso, it doesn’t mean that is actually going to happen. We have a destiny and we must accept it. We must try to stand out and stick to our dreams; yet life could offer us chances we didn’t expect. I’m writing this book to eventually get on stage and offer a presentation about Musicians’ life in a University or a music school. I am completely aware that it may never happen and that I may have to accept other kind of activity to make a living. I may not get to what I want, but life may offer me what I need. However, even if just a few people read this book and find a bit of advice that helps them being a musician, I can say I succeeded and it was worth doing. This goes for musicians too: accept whatever is coming, no matter where it comes from, and try to reach a success daily.

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Success is impossible if you are not able to look at the signs and see what’s offered on your path. Everyone has regrets occasionally, but the truth is they are irrelevant. Fate makes things happen and you are designed to be exactly where you are at this very moment. Don’t worry, it may change and if you have to make a breakthrough, you will. 

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Since we are all looking for different kinds of achievements, success can’t be defined by external parameters. A personal quest is similar to building a lane in which we add another cobble at our own pace, day after day. We carefully choose the cobbles that represent us most and we place them next to one another. People often perceive success as the top of the mountain they decided to climb on. It’s a mistake: success is the daily road they’ll have to walk to get to the top of the world. Money and fame are important, since they can make life easier. However, they aren’t the end per se; they are merely tools. What’s the point of having money if you have no inspiration? 

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Music fills hearts with passion and purpose; it gives energy and makes us feel powerful and stronger than anybody else. Music has the power of turning us into Samurais who know what they’re fighting for. With music, we are driven by passion. It resonates with every single body cell of ours. At some point, those feelings make musicians dream they could revolutionize music and become a big star. As far as music is perceived just as a hobby, it’s not that big of a deal. If you’re a beginner, I’m sure you dream from time to time that you are Jimmy Hendrix, Sting, Justin Timberlake, Jay-Z or Bono. 

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However, some amateur musicians nurture this passion as the illusion 24/7. They actually dream while being awake and put all their professional and personal frustrations into music. Music is my life”, they say, but know they won’t quit their job. I’m talking about talented musicians who dream their lives rather than living their dreams. They just wait for a producer to come knocking at their door, delighted by their talent. Others deceive themselves and find excuses for postponing their commitment: I don’t have time at the moment, but when I am older, I will play in the band of my dreams”. That’s not true: if they don’t do it now, they never will.

Success can’t be achieved that way.

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